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How To Tell If Sunglasses have UV Protection

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How To Tell If Sunglasses have UV Protection

Postby Shaolyn on Fri Jun 29, 2007 12:05 am

Can anyone tell me if there is any possible way to tell if some pair of sunglasses are UV protected, and or Polarized? thanks!
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UV / Polarization

Postby chicoboy on Fri Jun 29, 2007 11:13 am

Not sure about the UV protection--you will probably have to rely on manufacturer's claims ... But polarization is easy to detect.

One of the fastest ways is to look at an monocromatic LCD screen (the digital screen at a gas pump, or an LCD wristwatch for example) thru the lenses. You will probably see on first glance that the screen looks flat black (where are the numbers?) but as you tilt/rotate your head slightly (so one eye is higher than the other) you will see the display change. This is due to the interaction between the filter pattern in the glasses and the LCD screen.

Polarization is great at cutting glare, so you can often see thru a windshield to see the person inside instead of just a shiny piece of glass. Next time you are in a store, compare polarized lenses with normal ones by looking out the window at the cars parked in the sun. I think it's worth the extra cost, but good lenses are Pricy. I have a pair of Maui Jims (polarized, anti-reflective and UV blocking) that were around $200.
chicoboy
 

Re: UV / Polarization

Postby Guest on Fri Jun 29, 2007 11:20 am

chicoboy wrote:Not sure about the UV protection--you will probably have to rely on manufacturer's claims ... But polarization is easy to detect.

One of the fastest ways is to look at an monocromatic LCD screen (the digital screen at a gas pump, or an LCD wristwatch for example) thru the lenses. You will probably see on first glance that the screen looks flat black (where are the numbers?) but as you tilt/rotate your head slightly (so one eye is higher than the other) you will see the display change. This is due to the interaction between the filter pattern in the glasses and the LCD screen.

Polarization is great at cutting glare, so you can often see thru a windshield to see the person inside instead of just a shiny piece of glass. Next time you are in a store, compare polarized lenses with normal ones by looking out the window at the cars parked in the sun. I think it's worth the extra cost, but good lenses are Pricy. I have a pair of Maui Jims (polarized, anti-reflective and UV blocking) that were around $200.


oh ok. Do you think if i go to a certified store that sells sunglasses they will be able to tell?
Guest
 

UV protection

Postby Chicoboy on Fri Jun 29, 2007 1:31 pm

if you are talking about the UV protection ... they might be able to answer your question based on style and brand and familiarity with it.

Can't hurt to ask. If they don't recognize the brand/style, I don't know of a way to test for it unless you were to shine a UV light source at the lens then measure its strengh after passing thru it. This scenario is lab work ... probably beyond the capabilites typical mall shops.

I will add that UV protection is pretty common for new sunglasses over $5-$10 so you are pretty safe in assuming...

Hope that helps.
Chicoboy
 

Re: How To Tell If Sunglasses have UV Protection

Postby brian929 on Thu Nov 03, 2011 2:14 am

The material used in your sunglass lenses will affect their clarity, weight, durability and cost.

Glass—PROS: Superior optical[/link] clarity; superior scratch-nce. CONS: Heavier than others; expensive; glass will "spider" when impacted (but not chip or shatter).
NXT polyurethane—PROS: Superior impact-resistance; excellent opticaltweight. CONS: Expensive.
Polycarbona: Excellent impact-resistance; very good clarity; affordable; lightweight esistance; slightly less -clarity than glass or NXT.
Acrylic—PROS: Inexpensive alternative to polycarbonate, best suited for casual or occasional-use . CONS: Less durable and optically clear than polycarbonate or glass; some image distortion.

Lens Color (Tint)

All spy sunglasses lenses are tinted to cut down on overall bss and enhance terrain definition. But your choice of tint colors affect your vision by influencing 1) how much visible light reaches your eyes, 2) how well you see other colors, and 3) how well you see contrasts.

Brown/gray/green—Brown, gray and green lenses are color-neutral, which means they cut down on overall brightness without distorting colors. These darker shades are intended primarily to cut through the glare and reduce eyestrain in moderate-to-bright conditions.
Yellow/gold/amber—Yellow, gold and amber lenses provide less overall brightness protection, but excel in moderate-to-low level light conditions. They provide excellent depth perception, which makes them perfect for skiing, snowboarding and other snow sports. They also enhance contrasts in tricky, flat-light conditions.
Rose/vermilion—Rose- and vermilion-colored really do make the world seem brighter. They provide excellent low-light visibility and enhance contrast (perfect for skiing and snowboarding in cloudy conditions). They also enhance the visibility of objects against blue and green backgrounds, which makes them ideal for driving or exploring in forested areas.
Mirrored or flash coating—This refers to a reflective film applied to the outside surfaces of some lenses. They reduce glare by reflecting much of the light that hits the lens surface. Mirrored coatings make objects appear darker than they are, so lighter tints are often used to compensate for this.
Last edited by brian929 on Fri Nov 04, 2011 1:04 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: How To Tell If Sunglasses have UV Protection

Postby larumd on Thu Nov 03, 2011 7:10 am

If the materiel of the lenses isn't listed by the manufacturer you can always call and find out. This will let you know whether the lenses offer UV protection.
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Re: How To Tell If Sunglasses have UV Protection

Postby Rentasmo on Tue Jun 10, 2014 11:30 am

According to another article, Many opticians have UV photometers and may be willing to test your glasses for you.
Rentasmo
 

Re: How To Tell If Sunglasses have UV Protection

Postby larumd on Wed Jun 11, 2014 8:03 am

Excellent suggestion. Thank you for posting.
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Re: How To Tell If Sunglasses have UV Protection

Postby Esteban on Fri Aug 01, 2014 10:16 am

The only way to meassure the UV protection level, is witn a UV Meter tool, which will shot UV light through the lens, and measure on the other side, you should check with tour optician, those are relatively cheap instruments (180 - 600 USD) so I guess any optician should have one.

Bye.
Esteban
 

Re: How To Tell If Sunglasses have UV Protection

Postby larumd on Fri Aug 01, 2014 11:09 am

Well said! Thanks for posting.
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Re: How To Tell If Sunglasses have UV Protection

Postby icaheco on Wed Sep 03, 2014 12:43 am

Some companies sell UV meter that measure the capacity of your sunglasses to protect from UV rays. While other try to experiment using the UV flashlight. Using this, you have turn off the lights and shine the UV flashlight on to the glasses, when it glows in the dark it is UV protected. However, the result may not be same for sunglasses especially with those who filter the lights. But you can also try it and see for the results.
icaheco
 

Re: How To Tell If Sunglasses have UV Protection

Postby larumd on Wed Sep 03, 2014 8:16 am

The consumer can also see what model they have and check to see the material the lenses are made from. They can save time by contacting the manufacturer as well.
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Re: How To Tell If Sunglasses have UV Protection

Postby Neal Warne on Mon Sep 08, 2014 4:04 am

With the sun’s rays getting stronger and the days getting longer and warmer, the outdoors are calling out your name and telling you to come out and play. I believe that outdoor exercise is generally more beneficial than indoor, so this is a good thing.
Neal Warne
 

Re: How To Tell If Sunglasses have UV Protection

Postby larumd on Mon Sep 08, 2014 12:48 pm

Thank you for the post.
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