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Microscope For Grandson

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Microscope For Grandson

Postby cnjnj1 on Tue Dec 08, 2009 7:08 pm

My Grandson wants a Microscope for Christmas. He is 10 years old and highly Intelligent and curious. I want to get him something under $100. that would be a great starter microscope. Can anyone please give me some advice. I would greatly appreciate your help.


Thank You Very Much

Chris
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Re: Microscope For Grandson

Postby Jne_K on Wed Dec 09, 2009 7:47 am

Hi

In microscopes for this age group, your choice is between a toy microscope and a student microscope.

A toy microscope is not necessarily a bad thing (virtually all microscopes under $100 are toys, regardless of the advertising). Toy microscopes can be useful if you want to foster an interest in microscopes/science and if a toy microscope accomplishes this, it may be money well spent. A toy microscope is also a good choice for a parent who simply wants to test the waters to see if a child has an interest in science.

However, if the child's interest grows beyond that initial spark, you are faced with buying another, more expensive microscope. Toy microscopes lack the features needed to learn all the basics of microscope use and toy microscopes do not have the durability needed for extended work. Product lifespan at this price is predictably short. As educational tools, a toy microscope will be a step down in terms of features and quality from a microscope used in even an elementary school classroom.

For a reasonably decent toy microscope with enough build quality to last more than a few weeks, try the [url=Hi

In microscopes for this age group, your choice is between a toy microscope and a student microscope.

A toy microscope is not necessarily a bad thing (virtually all microscopes under $100 are toys, regardless of the advertising). Toy microscopes can be useful if you want to foster an interest in microscopes/science and if a toy microscope accomplishes this, it may be money well spent. A toy microscope is also a good choice for a parent who simply wants to test the waters to see if a child has an interest in science.

However, if the child's interest grows beyond that initial spark, you are faced with buying another, more expensive microscope. Toy microscopes lack the features needed to learn all the basics of microscope use and toy microscopes do not have the durability needed for extended work. Product lifespan at this price is predictably short. As educational tools, a toy microscope will be a step down in terms of features and quality from a microscope used in even an elementary school classroom.

For a reasonably decent toy microscope with enough build quality to last more than a few weeks, try the Celestron, http://www.opticsplanet.com/celestron-j ... scope.html

For projects and other applications that actually require you to use a microscope, similar to what a student actually does in school, you need a student microscope. To qualify as a student microscope, a microscope must have, as an absolute minimum, dual focusing - coarse and fine focusing. A microscope without dual focusing is nearly impossible to use at high magnifications. Under $100, the only model with that essential feature is the Konus College,but this model does not have a built-in light. As a former science teacher, I highly recommend a model with a built-in light for students when buying a student microscope.

For a microscope with the quality and features of a microscope used in a
middle school or high school science class, expect to pay $150-200. Good
choices here include the Celestron 44014, the Unico M100, or the Barska AY11238,

For honors work or college level work, a model with a binocular head greatly reduces eye fatigue over long observing session. Good choices here include the Celestron 44108, the Konus Campus, or the Barska AY11236,

I highly recommend some prepared slides to get any beginner off to a good start. One of the Konus slides sets is a good choice.

For a beginners guide on how to choose your first microscope, see my
article, Microscope Guide for Beginners,

For the basics on what makes for a good student microscope and more, see my article, Microscopes for Students
Thanks for posting with us
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