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Clouds

Postby jeremyd on Tue Apr 19, 2011 9:58 pm

Hello,
I am a storm chaser/storm spotter and I'm currently trying to look at options for night vision to be able to see different features of storms at night (such as tornadoes, etc). Of course, there are times when you can see these things when the lightning is flashing frequently enough and in the right location (so the 'back lighting' is good.) However, I don't want to just rely on the lightning.

I would prefer something as inexpensive as possible but good enough to tell what I'm looking at with the storms (if thats even possible) - probably from up to 4 or 5 miles away up in the sky (it wouldn't be 100% dark though of course due to the lightning with storms). I would also like to record things using the night vision device if possible. I have been looking at 'digital night vision' products but not sure if these items would work for what I'm looking for.

Thanks for the help,

Jeremy
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Re: Clouds

Postby Steven_L on Tue Apr 26, 2011 9:35 am

I tried a few items in the storms the last few days to answer your question. A good gen 3 or 4 monocular like the ATN NVM does a good job showing storm clouds, but costs a few thousand bucks. A gen one ATN viper for under $300.00 will show clouds, but resolution is poor, it lacks sensitivity, and you won't get any distance out of it. The iGen digital barely worked. Digitals do not amplify light enough to work at those distances. Better resolution than a gen one, but still pretty poor. So if you really want any performance, you'll have to go to a gen two or better monocular, starting at about two grand. It is possible to hook a camera to it, but if you get one, I would advise you to see if it's worth it to you to record what you're seeing. You can hold the monocular in front of a camera pretty easily. I would try that first before spending more money. A gen one in front of a camera would work pretty poorly.
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