Products
2,496 Brands 483 Categories All Departments

Hunting Bino, low light

Post a reply


Enter the code exactly as it appears. All letters are case insensitive.
Smilies
:D :) :( :o :shock: :? 8) :lol: :x :P :oops: :cry: :evil: :twisted: :roll: :wink: :!: :?: :idea: :arrow: :| :mrgreen:
BBCode is ON
[img] is OFF
[flash] is OFF
[url] is ON
Smilies are ON
Topic review
   

Expand view Topic review: Hunting Bino, low light

Re: Hunting Bino, low light

Post by Jne_K on Tue Oct 26, 2010 11:03 am

Hi

Both excellent, but in my tests, the Pentax was brighter and had better contrast

Re: Hunting Bino, low light

Post by Guest on Tue Oct 26, 2010 9:22 am

Joanie,
Thanks for your help. How would you compare the Minox HG 10x43 BR with the Pentax DCF ED?
Kadiddle

Re: Hunting Bino, low light

Post by Jne_K on Wed Oct 20, 2010 9:48 am

Hi

Those are tough jobs for even an expensive binocular, though it won't be as simple as just spending more money or going to a larger objective, either. If your eyes are getting old, say you're over forty, going to a larger exit pupil, say a 10x56 may be a waste of money, since our eyes can no longer use as large an exit pupil as when we were young. My limit, right now, for instance is a bout 5 mm. Moreover, I would think very seriously before going to a larger bino for the type of hunting you describe, anyway. Ounces count in mountain hunting.

The feature I would look for in a bino is contrast, though that, per se, is not a feature listed in any binocular spec table. More contrast tends to highlight detail, especially in shadows. Binoculars with ED and HD objectives, though, tend to have the best contrast and also resolution, so look for that feature. ED and HD is now finding its way into lower and lower price points, but as you might expect, just having ED or HD is no guarantee of great optics. If you can get into that $1000 price point, I can vouch for the Pentax DCF ED as having superb contrast. That's where I would begin, if you can afford it.

Hunting Bino, low light

Post by kadiddle on Wed Oct 20, 2010 7:11 am

I've been using a pair of Nikon Monarch 10X42 for about 6 or 7 years. On an Elk hunt this weekend I noticed that it was difficult to pick out detail in the shadows over 300 yards away, mid day, clear skies. Also, at dusk I was glassing a mule deer and a big bull elk, trying to evaluate the racks but had some difficulty doing so. The conditions were clear skies and just at the edge of legal shooting time (20 minutes after sunset).
Part of the problem may be aging eyes, but I was wondering how much I would have to spend to get something that would perform better. My preference would be to spend in the $400-$500 range, but if that is impossible let me know what is needed.
Thanks,
Kadiddle

Top

cron