2,379 Brands 450 Categories All Departments

Newbie to Telescpoes

Post a reply


Enter the code exactly as it appears. All letters are case insensitive.
Smilies
:D :) :( :o :shock: :? 8) :lol: :x :P :oops: :cry: :evil: :twisted: :roll: :wink: :!: :?: :idea: :arrow: :| :mrgreen:
BBCode is ON
[img] is OFF
[flash] is OFF
[url] is ON
Smilies are ON
Topic review
   

Expand view Topic review: Newbie to Telescpoes

Re: Newbie to Telescpoes

Post by Jne_K on Wed Jun 23, 2010 7:56 am

Hi

You will need more than one eyepiece to do astronomy and when we get to serious scopes, you usually only get one eyepiece. The filters can wait, yes, but don't expect to do much astronomy unless you have three eyepieces or, alternately, two eyepieces and a barlow. See my article, Ten Telescope Eyepiece Questions.

Re: Newbie to Telescpoes

Post by Rosemarry on Tue Jun 22, 2010 10:48 pm

I could afford Eyepieces, filters, etc. straight away with the SW or does the extra size of the 8" Cel out-weigh that, could the extras wait a few months? :roll: :roll: :roll:

Post by Jne_K on Thu Jan 08, 2009 7:15 am

Hi

Planets change position by the year and even month. Check the position of any planet by going online at one of the astronomy websites such as Sky&Telescope and Astronomy magazine or buy the printed versions in any good bookstore.

Post by Okiejon on Wed Jan 07, 2009 7:52 pm

AstroBoy wrote:Just so you don't have unrealistic expectations:

Stars will "appear to be white lights with no detail at all" in any optical telescope, even the most powerful in existence. They are much too far away to ever see anything other than a point of light.

A decent telescope will give you great views of the moon, fair views of planets like Saturn (under good conditions, you'll be able to see a ring or two, under fair conditons, you'll just see a bump), Jupiter (under good conditions you'll see some bands, but don't expect colors), Mars (reddish disc, under good conditions you can make out the polar caps) and you can make out Venus and sometimes Mercury as crescents.

If you don't have light pollution or haze, you'll be able to make out deep space objects (some galaxies and nebulae) as a sort of whispy glow.

If you want better than that, you have to get into astrophotography or astro-imaging as you simply can't gather enough light in real-time for the eye to see much detail.


Which direction would some of these plantes be?

I live in rural Oklahoma and have no pollution,etc.
I have seen awesome views of the moon but really dont know where to look for planets.
I have a Celestron Omni XLT 102mm

Post by AstroBoy on Fri Apr 13, 2007 5:04 pm

Just so you don't have unrealistic expectations:

Stars will "appear to be white lights with no detail at all" in any optical telescope, even the most powerful in existence. They are much too far away to ever see anything other than a point of light.

A decent telescope will give you great views of the moon, fair views of planets like Saturn (under good conditions, you'll be able to see a ring or two, under fair conditons, you'll just see a bump), Jupiter (under good conditions you'll see some bands, but don't expect colors), Mars (reddish disc, under good conditions you can make out the polar caps) and you can make out Venus and sometimes Mercury as crescents.

If you don't have light pollution or haze, you'll be able to make out deep space objects (some galaxies and nebulae) as a sort of whispy glow.

If you want better than that, you have to get into astrophotography or astro-imaging as you simply can't gather enough light in real-time for the eye to see much detail.

Post by opticsplanet.com on Fri Apr 13, 2007 7:20 am

Hi

The Bushnell 4" Mak is a great scope for the money, optically, but the Northstar GOTO is limited in comparison to the Meade Autostar. If you want to expand into some astrophotography, I would go with the Meade, here. The difference in price is primarily a function of the special purchase we made from Meade on the 2114LNT (not 2130). It is usually a $350 telescope.

For more on the basics and how to choose a telescope, see my article
How to choose the right telescope, http://www.opticsplanet.com/how-to-buy-a-telescope.html

Newbie to Telescpoes

Post by EZ on Thu Apr 12, 2007 8:54 pm

[url]The two [url=http://www.opticsplanet.com/telescopes.html]telescopes[/url] below appear to be comparable in specs, both have a best rating so the question is what are the differences. Is there $210.00 difference in quality and for someone who has never had a telescope what images should be expected out of this price range of telescope? I really hate purchasing something and then be disappointed in the quality. I currently have a Bushnell Legend 20-60x 60mm Spotting Scope that I use at a rifle range and nature watching, I do know this is not a telescope even though I have used it for lunar shots and have seen some details. Stars appear to be white lights whith no detail at all and I cannot say that I have able to see much else in the night sky with this scope. Just for clarification I did not purchase a spotting scope to scan the skies, I did purchase it for the rifle range and am please with that purpose. What is the big difference that I will see between the spotting scope and an actual telescope? Remember I am a newbie in this area.[/url]
http://www.opticsplanet.com/meade-ds-21 ... 20132.html $179.00

http://www.opticsplanet.com/bushnell-no ... scope.html $386.99

Top