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televue eyepices for terrestrial viewing

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Expand view Topic review: televue eyepices for terrestrial viewing

Re: televue eyepices for terrestrial viewing

Post by Jne_K on Mon Aug 02, 2010 11:26 am

Hi

I wouldn't be afraid to recommend any of the Radians as far as day use, but keep the issue of practical daytime magnification in mind. The atmosphere is really the limiting factor as to how much magnification you can use on any given day. Out west, where the air is drier and often thinner, due to elevation, I have often used 80x quite effectively on some days for birding. Back in the humid east, I have gone for a week without being able to get much over 45x without significant blurring. Your call on magnification, but 30-40x is typically your best all around magnification. For digiscoping, drop it down to about 20 or 25x, though. You can always kick in more magnification with the optical zoom on the camera.

Re: televue eyepices for terrestrial viewing

Post by kylemac23 on Mon Aug 02, 2010 12:49 am

thanks for the reply, as far as the radian eyepieces go are there any specific ones of those that I should avoid for land viewing? I read a review on the 85 with a guy using 12mm, 8mm, and 5mm radians and said they were impressive. So if the radians are suitable for land and you could pick four of them which ones would you suggest?
I was going for the naglers like you said but Iam also able to buy two radians and get two free. So Im a little unsure on weather to go with the radians or naglers.

Re: televue eyepices for terrestrial viewing

Post by Jne_K on Tue Jul 27, 2010 8:02 am

Hi

Yes, there are others. What you want to avoid are the specific models, such as the Nagler 12mm, Type 4 that have a reputation for kidney bean and blackening out at the edge of the field when used in daylight. These are poor choices for daylight work. Remember, Naglers, were designed from the getgo to be astronomy eyepieces, not daytime eyepieces. Some work, some don't, as daytime eyepieces. Right now I do use a 22 mm Nagler for a lot of my digiscoping and daylight work and love it. It would duplicate, though, what you already have with your 24 mm Panoptic. I have used the Radians for day work, though they tend to be a little fussy about eye placement for day work to suit me. You might try some of the shorter focal length Panoptics, assuming they have enough eye relief to suit you. I have also used the Pentax XWs for day work and highly recommend them all. Great eyepieces, as well.

The Meade, Televue and Vixen zooms will work in your scope. I don't rate them on a par with the fixed power Televue eyepieces, but they aren't bad and will work for most of your daytime needs, though I stay with fixed powers for digiscoping. My first choice, though, in a zoom would probably be the Pentax zoom 70509. It ranks right up there, in my book, with premium spotting scope zoom eyepieces. Unfortunately, it is priced like one, too.

televue eyepices for terrestrial viewing

Post by kylemac23 on Mon Jul 26, 2010 10:00 pm

Hello again, awhile back you gave ma a few suggestions on eyepices for land viewing such as the Panoptic 24mm (25x), Nagler 11mm (54x), and a 7mm Nagler (85x) for the televue 85. And how you said not all televues are suitable for land viewing but these are. My question is are there any more televue eyepices that are
suitable for land viewing other than those three and how do I tell or find out weather a televue eyepice is suitable for land viewing. I was kind of looking for one to give me around 100-120x.
Also what do you think would be the best zoom eyepice for the televue 85?

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